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Duck milk moe

Zaia

Zaia grew up in a family of musicians in Holland, and has a background in top sport (snow skiing) and web development and design. She co-founded the PRI Luganville and PRI Sunshine Coast Inc (now PermEco Inc.) with Tom, and runs the “invisible structures”, like finances, business administration, website design and maintenance, writes articles, records and edits videos and also organises the cooking and the kitchen on site. She assists Tom in running the Kendall Permaculture Farm and supervising other volunteers. She also specialises in consulting and advice for smaller scale properties (up to 5 acres). She has researched and studied nutrition and health for 20+ years, has a certificate in Nutrition and continues to study by research, reading and daily observation. She is an active member of several musical projects and bands, involved in community music and runs percussion and marimba workshops, is the percussion leader for the Woodford Folk Festival People’s Orchestra and composes as well as plays music. She is passionate about community music and loves seeing people discover that they can play!

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2 Responses

  1. Serge says:

    Hi Zaia, I’m interested in knowing some more about your sour dough bread. How do you slow down the fermentation to stretch it 72 hour.
    I make mine over about 16 hours.
    I have been making sour dough bread using a sour dough I started with organic grape juice around 20 years ago. I only use organic spelt flour (it’s the only one I am satisfied hasn’t been tempered with by agri business lab)

    • Zaia says:

      Hey Serge,
      Just use your normal starter (I assume that will work). I Use spelt flour as well. To start, I put one cup of flour, about 1/4 cup of starter and 1 – 1 1/2 cups of water. Mix together in an earthenware or plastic bowl with a wooden or plastic spoon. Cover with a plastic bag and wrap with teatowels (to stop the bugs coming in) and stand for 24 hours. The next day add a cup of flour and stir, cover again and stand for another 24 hours. The third day add enough flour so it becomes a kneadable dough. Knead the doug and put it into your bread baking dishes (mine are ceramic). Cover again as before and stand for another 24 hours. The bread will rise in its dish and you will then just need to pop the dish into the oven and bake at around 180C for around 45 minutes. Hope this helps!

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